Prof. David Dickson is a graduate of the University of Dublin, a Fellow of Trinity College Dublin and a Member of the Royal Irish Academy. He served as Head of the Department of Modern History from 1995 to 1998 and is Associate Professor of Modern History. He was awarded a Government of Ireland Senior Research Fellowship by the Irish Humanities and Social Science Research Council for 2002-3.
He was a founding editor of the journal Irish Economic and Social History and is a former President of the Economic and Social History Society of Ireland. He was a co-founder of the African Studies Association of Ireland. He is currently Co-Director of the Centre for Irish-Scottish and Comparative Studies.
David Dickson has published extensively on the social, economic and cultural history of Ireland in the long eighteenth century. Past collaborative research projects have included the demographic history of eighteenth-century Ireland; the comparative history of famine in Ireland; and the social history of eighteenth and nineteenth-century Dublin.
His current research interests are in [a] the long-term impact of Irish cities on Irish society; [b] Irish migrations in the long eighteenth century; [c] weather crises in Irish history; [d] Ireland and nineteenth-century empire; and [e] the Irish book trade.

Dr Lisa Marie Griffith completed her PhD at the School of Histories and Humanities at Trinity College Dublin in 2008 on Social Mobility and Dublin Merchants between 1760 and 1800. She is a co-editor of Pue's Occurrences, the Irish History blog, and teaches at the National Print Museum where she is Coordinator of the Culture and Heritage Programme.

Dr Ciaran O’Neill completed a PhD at the University of Liverpool in 2010, and took up his post in nineteenth century history at TCD in 2011. His current research interests include social stratification, transnational education and the formation of elites in Ireland. In 2012 he will begin working on the broad topic of social mobility in nineteenth-century Dublin.

Dr Ciarán Wallace completed his PhD on Local politics and government in Dublin city and suburbs 1899-1914 in 2010 at Trinity College, Dublin. His research interests include civil society, Irish urban history and its placement in a wider United Kingdom framework. He has taught on British and Irish history, Irish studies, Culture & Heritage studies and historiography. He is currently an IRCHSS Government of Ireland Postdoctoral Fellow working on a monograph Divided City: Dublin and its unionist townships 1899-1916.